GenUnlimited

#GenUnlimited Youth Challenge

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GenUnlimited

Today, the majority of the world’s 1.8 billion young people live in lower income countries. Poverty, conflict and disadvantage continue to limit the lives of millions of young people. Many do not complete secondary education and are not acquiring the skills they need to secure jobs – and thus, brighter futures for themselves and their families. The #GenUnlimited Rotary – UNICEF Co- creation Challenge seeks to support young men and women under the age of 24 years to identify, understand and solve challenges they and their peers face.

Eligibility

  1. Under the age of 24
  2. Not associated with a company or startup funding the innovations.
  3. Unique & Original Ideas.
  4. A problem-solving innovation implementable in an informal settlement to help marginalised communities.

Entry categories

Secondary Education

More adolescents should be in formal secondary or non-formal alternative learning pathways alongside continuous improvements in the quality of learning. This includes starting with the most disadvantaged, such as girls, adolescents on the move and in situations of conflict, adolescents with disabilities, and the poorest.
Globally more than 200 million adolescents are out of school. If current trends continue, less than half of secondary school age children in low-income countries will complete their secondary education, and only 10 percent will master higher learning skills. In North Africa and West Asia, there are 135 adolescent girls
out of school for every 100 adolescent boys. In sub-Saharan Africa, girls are more likely to be out of school at every age. In the Caribbean, on the other hand, boys are more likely to be out of school. Some vulnerable groups have very low enrolment. Some studies suggest that only 10% of all children with disabilities are in school and of this number only half who begin, actually complete their primary education, with many leaving after only a few months or years, because they are gaining little from the experience. With the current pace of change it will take a century for poor children and adolescents to have the same skill development opportunities as children in rich countries Design Challenge examples focused on informal settlements in Kenya:
● How can we build a system that encourages the continuation of schooling, even for the most marginalised?
● How can we reduce the number of adolescents (or girls or specific communities) dropping out of secondary education?
● How can we make the learning content more appealing (or relevant) to young people aged 12-14 to discourage dropping out?
● How can we help build the environment/ecosystem for easier access to learning?
● How can we support building accessible and inclusive learning platforms, so youth with and without disabilities can study together?

● How can we support self-paced/individualised learning in difficult situations, such as conflict situations?
● How can we support self-paced/ individualised learning for married or pregnant girls and young women or those who are already mothers?

Employability & decent work skills.

In 2017, an estimated 21.8 per cent of young people are not in employment, education or training (NEET), 76.9 per cent of which are female.
Adolescents and young people should have access to opportunities to develop skills for learning, employability and active citizenship. They also need support as they transition from education to work. Examples of support include apprenticeships and internships. They will need digital and technological skills for the workforce of the future and for emerging economies including the green and care economies.
In addition, they need skills that promote resilience, tolerance and leadership, especially for girls and young women. For some marginalised groups, e.g. adolescents with disabilities and those leaving in institutions, additional social skills training may be required. Design Challenge examples focused on informal settlements in Kenya:
● How can we support young people to be prepared for the transition to, and navigation of, the labor market?
○ N.B. This challenge could be specifically tailored for certain groups, e.g. girls or young women, married or pregnant girls, young people who have dropped out of school or young people with disabilities.

● How can we help young people acquire the skills for meaningful and decent work?
○ N.B. This challenge could be specifically tailored for certain groups, e.g. girls or young women, married or pregnant girls, young people who have dropped out of school or young people with disabilities.

● How can we support employers to give up their gender biases?
● How can we create incentives for young women and men to enter job fields which are not traditional for their gender but are growing in value?
● How can we expand access to remote learning and work opportunities for young people who live in refugee camps or have limited local opportunities?
● How can we create new jobs that also have a positive impact on the environment?

Empowerment of the youth in marginalised & informal settlements

For adolescent girls, boys and other young people to grow into productive citizens, they need support to understand their rights (especially when they are marginalised) and to make life choices. This includes opportunities to civically engage, including digitally, and voice their opinions on issues that affect them –
issues such as gender equality, climate change and environmental sustainability. When they start farther behind, girls and other marginalised groups need additional support to help them build lifelong assets like networks, capital, knowledge and skills, resilience, role models and self-belief.
Design Challenge examples focused on informal settlements in Kenya:
• How can young people play a role in encouraging and influencing governments to create and finance systems where even the most marginalised and disadvantaged young people, in particular girls get the opportunity to civically engage?
• How can we change behaviours so that household chores and care work is shared by all?
• How can we ensure the workplace and work environment is inclusive and accessible for all?
• How can we reach parity of pay?
• How can we reach equal rates of participation in the formal work force for women and men?
• How can we connect role models, mentors peers with youth with and without disability?
• How can we solve problems of safe mobility for young women who want to work late hours or want to travel significant distances to work?
• How can boys and young men lead change in their behaviour that makes public spaces and public transport safer for women?
• How can we have more equality in leadership positions in the government?
• How can we have more equality in leadership positions in corporations?
Throughout the three themes, also focus on youth with disabilities
● How can we build an environment inclusive to people with disabilities?
● How can we expand access to remote learning for young people with disabilities who have limited
opportunities due to lack of accessible infrastructure around them, lack of accessible learning
materials and stigma around their disability.
● How can we connect role models, mentors peers with youth with and without disability?
● How can we support young people with disabilities to gain equal opportunities to employment
including those with physical, sensory, intellectual, psycho-social disability?
● How can we support employers to become more inclusive and provide equal opportunities for
youth with disabilities?
● How can we break stereotypes around gender biases of youth with disabilities?

Timelines:

  1. 24th – Applications Open.
  2. 10th Oct. Applications close.
  3. 15th – Pre Bootcamp/ Announcement of shortlisted applicants.
  4. 22nd – 27th – #GenUnlimtedKe Bootcamp.
  5. 9th – 10th November – #GenUnlimited Exhibition

REWARDS.

  1. 20 Innovations will be selected for the Rotary day at the UN Exhibition Fair where they will showcase their innovations to over 800 delegates.
  2. 5 Innovations will be nominated and awarded financial assistance of $1000 as seed funding.
  3. A 6 week UNICEF Kenya mentoring and Incubation process support.
  4. Be trained by UNICEF Kenya on crafting and scaling humanitarian innovations.
  5. Out of the five finalists, two will be chosen to move forward globally.
  6. Be recognised for their impactful innovations that are addressing the most essential needs in our communities.
  7. A spot at the Innovations Week at the University of Nairobi plus, a scholarship with the University.
  8. Accepted in UNICEF Kenya Young Peoples Program and become a part of UNICEF Kenya Youth Community.

Email innovators@rotaryundaynairobi.org

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